LARCENY & THEFT

DEGREES OF LARCENY

Under Connecticut Law, larceny is differentiated by degrees: first degree larceny being the most serious offense, and sixth degree larceny being the least serious.

FIRST DEGREE LARCENY

If you are accused of stealing over $10,000, you will be charged with first degree larceny. This is a Class B felony, punishable by:

  • Prison sentence of 1-20 years
  • Fine of up to $15,000

SECOND DEGREE LARCENY

If you are accused of stealing between $5,000-$10,000, you will be charged with second degree larceny. This is a Class C felony, and it is punishable by:

  • Prison sentence of 1-10 years
  • Fine of up to $10,000

THIRD DEGREE LARCENY

If you are accused of stealing between $1,000-5,000, you will be charged with third degree larceny. This is considered a Class D felony, and is punishable by:

  • Prison sentence of 1-5 years
  • Fine of up to $5,000

FOURTH DEGREE LARCENY

If you are accused of stealing between $500-1,000 worth of merchandise, you will be charged with fourth degree larceny. This is a Class A misdemeanor, and it is punishable by:

  • Prison sentence of up to 1 year
  • Fine of up to $2,000

FIFTH DEGREE LARCENY

If you are accused of stealing between $250-500, you will be charged with fifth degree larceny. This is a Class B misdemeanor, and is punishable by:

  • Prison sentence of up to six months
  • Fine of up to $1,000

SIXTH DEGREE LARCENY

If you are accused of stealing less than $250 worth of property, you will be accused of sixth degree larceny. This is a Class C misdemeanor, and is punishable by:

  • Prison sentence of up to three months
  • Fine of up to $500

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

I borrowed someone’s property, but then I forgot to return it. Is that considered larceny?

Intent is a key factor in a larceny charge. If it was an honest mistake, and you genuinely forgot to return property that a friend willingly lent you, you will most likely not be charged with larceny. However, if you knowingly took something that you had no intention of returning it, this can be considered larceny. Additionally, if the rightful owner asks for their property back, and you refuse to comply, you can be charged with larceny.

 

What If I take someone’s property as a joke, or prank? Is that considered larceny?

Larceny is the act of deliberately taking someone else’s property with the intention of keeping it forever. If you took someone’s property as a joke or a prank, an attorney may be able to make the argument that your intention was not to deprive the rightful owner his or her property. However, that will be for a judge or a jury to decide. In this situation, a larceny charge and conviction will depend on your personal case. When in doubt, you should never take someone else’s personal property.

 

Can a minor face larceny charges? 

Yes, a minor can face larceny charges. Typically, a juvenile charged with larceny will face less serious penalties than an adult. If your child has been charged with larceny, you should contact a juvenile defense lawyer immediately.

 

I have been charged with larceny. What should I do now?

If you have been charged with larceny, you should contact an attorney who has experience handling larceny cases right away. Do not volunteer information to the police or answer any other questions until you have an attorney present. Contact The Kaloidis Law Firm, LLC today for a free case evaluation.